Cuesta College :: Physics 205A :: Fall 2017
Calendar Policies Goals Grades
    *.html

Monday 
"Get to work.  Your work is to keep cranking the flywheel that turns the gears that spin the belt in the engine of belief that keeps you and your desk in midair."
     --Annie Dillard, The Writing Life, Harper & Row (1989), p. 11.

Quiz 4: 11:00-11:25 AM
     **NO  PHONES/LAPTOPS/TABLETS ALLOWED**
     **USE YOUR OWN GRAPHING/REGULAR CALCULATOR** 
     WRITE NAME AND P.I.N. ALONG EDGE OF QUIZ
     CIRCLE ALL ANSWERS DIRECTLY ON QUIZ
     FINISHED EARLY?  TURN IN QUIZ, BE CONSIDERATE AND QUIET
          (WELCOME TO WAIT OUTSIDE IF YOU WANT TO TALK)

Group quiz (3-4 students/group, write names on back of "scratcher") 
     0.3 points for each "first scratch" correct answer
     0.1 points for each "second scratch" correct answer 

Quiz 5 worksheet questions (*.pdf)

Chs. 8.2, 8.6, 9.4, 9.5: "Rotational Dynamics" (*.blog)
     Ex: Cooper's Hill Cheese-Rolling and Wake event (*.blog)



Laboratory 
Tuesday 
Read Physics, 10/e, Chs. 11.1-11.6
Review previous reading assignment responses (*.blog)

Preview online presentations (*.blog), (*.blog)
     (The difference in pressure ΔP between two points in a static fluid (liquid or gas) depends on the fluid's density and the difference in heights/depths, as well as the gravitational constant g.  Provided you know what the pressure is at your starting location, you can find out the pressure at a different location, because going up in a fluid means that the pressure decreases by that ΔP value, and going down in a fluid means that pressure increases by that ΔP value.  The buoyant force can be calculated from the density of the fluid that surrounds an object (and not the object's density!) and the object's total volume (if fully submerged) or part of the object's volume (just the "underwater" portion, if floating), as well as the gravitational constant g.  This is an entirely new force, and is in addition to whatever weight, tension, normal forces, etc. are also exerted on a submerged or floating object.)

Physics quiz question: rotational inertia of Solowheel wheel (*.blog)
Physics quiz question: comparing rotational inertiae of ring and disk (*.blog)
Physics midterm question: downhill rolling rings (*.blog)
Ch. 9 Example 9 (p. 232)
Ch. 9 Problem 57

Due 12:00 AM before start of next lecture
     Reading assignment 18 (*.html)
     Homework report 18 (*.html)



Wednesday 
"Water, taken in moderation, cannot hurt anybody."
    --Mark Twain, Notebooks & Journals: 1855-1873, Volume 1, 
      University of California Press, Berkeley (1975), p. 189.

Quiz 5 worksheet questions (*.pdf)

Chs. 11.1-11.6: Static Fluids (*.blog)
     Ex: Caliente Mountain air pressure (*.blog)
     Ex: partially versus fully submerged submarines (*.blog)
     Ex: cargo ship traveling from saltwater to freshwater ports (*.blog)



Thursday 
Check Twitter announcements: #CuestaPhys205A
Read Physics, 10/e, Chs. 11.7-11.9
Review previous reading assignment responses (*.blog)

Preview online presentation (*.blog)
     (We assume that "ideal fluid flow" is "steady-state" (not "just turned on," but allowed to be steady after going on for some time), and does not have turbulence ("unsteady" streamlines) or drag ("viscosity").  There are two conservation laws that apply to ideal fluid flow--the continuity equation: conservation of the fluid itself (this is not a trivial conservation law!); and Bernoulli's equation: the conservation of energy densities (pressure, gravity energy density, and velocity energy density).)

Physics quiz question: Costa Concordia ledge water pressure (*.blog)
Physics quiz question: Mt. Whitney vs. Badwater Basin pressure difference (*.blog)
Physics quiz question: air pressure in Krubera Cave (*.blog)
Physics quiz question: hanging vs. anchored submerged objects (*.blog)
Physics quiz question: raising the sunken Mighty Servant 3 (*.blog)
Physics midterm question: partially versus fully submerged buoys (*.blog)
Physics midterm question: rising water level in dry dock (*.blog)

Due 12:00 AM before start of next lecture
     Reading assignment 19 (*.html)
     Homework report 19 (*.html)